Travel essentials, tracker apps and The Future of Work podcast.

by Natalie Rahn Read more from the Building an Accountable Workforce issue

The Future of Work Podcast

Jacob Morgan, a best-selling author and futurist, has spent the greater part of a decade researching how the workplace of the future will operate. He brings abundant knowledge to his weekly podcast exploring how transforming industries are reshaping contemporary leadership dynamics, talent acquisition and development practices, and the innovation process. He not only shares his insights but interviews top thinkers and executives—including Leena Nair, the first female chief human resources officer of Unilever, and Sylvia Metayer, CEO of worldwide corporate services at Sodexo—to bring in fresh perspectives on the upshots of rapidly changing business landscapes. With more than 150 episodes in the archives, there is something for everyone.

Tracker Apps

These applications will help you hold yourself and your team more accountable.

CEO accountabilityScoro

This app organizes the most important team information—including project files, to-dos, key contacts and top revenue earners—to help you keep track of day-to-day activities more effectively. Additionally, it will dissect various data—such as financial and task-based goals—so you are always on top of the team’s performance.

Available on: iOS, Android

Browser_Inside2DropTask

DropTask integrates information from apps such as Evernote and Outlook to organize tasks, calendar events and files into project profiles. Other members can be added to communicate and be assigned specific tasks by the administrator. Each task shows the person responsible and his or her progress, making it easier to hold people accountable.

Available on: iOS, Android

Browser_Inside4Spark

This app takes email to a whole new level. The app connects with major email providers and supports key tools like Dropbox and OneDrive. It sends you notifications for important emails and has preset quick replies for emails that need recognition like “Thanks” or “Call Me.” Spark’s newest version, released in 2017, allows users to annotate, sign and edit PDFs within the app.

Available on: iOS, Apple Watch

This Is Your Life: Travel Essentials

Thanks to technology, it is easier than ever for executives to manage their health and well-being while on the road.

tumi Lost and Found

TUMI Global Locator, $150

The rate of lost luggage has decreased 70 percent since 2007 and will continue to fall, according to industry IT company SITA. This is great

news, but it does not make losing luggage any less stressful.

Thankfully, global travel lifestyle brand TUMI teamed up with AT&T to launch TUMI Global Locator—a wireless tracking device that uses GPS, GSM, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth technology to track the location of your bags. Real-time data—accessible via an app—monitors the luggage in four modes: Travel Mode, Sleep Mode, Hotel Mode and Proximity Mode. While in Travel Mode, the device automatically tracks a bag’s location every 20 to 30 minutes and builds a history of where it has been. In compliance with Federal Aviation Administration requirements, the Global Locator powers-down to Sleep Mode upon takeoff and automatically wakes upon landing.

Uniquely Wireless

Sony WF-1000X, $200

Earbuds are ubiquitous. But true wireless ones that include noise-canceling technology are unique—making Sony’s latest entrée into the field buzzworthy. The Sony WF-1000X earbuds connect to an app that allows the user to adjust between complete noise cancellation or ambient sound. These buds are by no means perfect, however. They are bulkier than some of their counterparts, which do not offer noise-canceling technology. Early users have also reported minor connectivity issues.

nimaChemistry Kit

Nima, $279

Business travel means eating meals out. For those living with dietary restrictions like celiac disease, choosing the right place and the right meal can be stressful.

Nima hopes to take some of that worry away. The device, which resembles a portable insulin monitor, allows users to test food for traces of gluten in roughly three minutes. In addition to the monitor, there is a network of Nima-tested restaurants with reviews from other users: It not only names which restaurants serve gluten-free meals but specifies which dishes hit the mark. While Nima is most useful for those with gluten sensitivities, the company is soon set to release a version for people who live with peanut allergies.


Natalie Rahn

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