A GLOBAL DIGITAL PICTURE

The World Economic Forum measures countries' application of information and communication technologies (ICT), which power productivity gains and social development. The 2015 rankings were determined through a network-readiness index comprising 10 political, economic, environmental and social metrics.

SINGAPORE'S REINVENTION STORY

In just a few decades, Singapore has emerged as a leader in ICT. It stands out in three areas in particular.

Metric 1: Environment

The country's market and regulatory framework (1-7, 7 being the best)

Singapore:
5.9
1
2
3
4
5
6
7

New Zealand: 5.7
Finland: 5.6
U.K.: 5.5
Hong Kong: 5.5
Norway: 5.5

Metric 2: Impact

Economic and social impacts that stem from ICT

Singapore:
6.0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7

Netherlands: 5.9
Finland: 5.8
Sweden: 5.7
South Korea; U.S.: 5.6

Metric 3: Usage

Current and projected use of ICT by individuals, government and business

Singapore:
5.9
1
2
3
4
5
6
7

Sweden, Finland, Japan, Netherlands, South Korea: 5.9
Luxembourg: 5.8
Norway, Denmark, U.S.: 5.7
Switzerland, U.K., U.A.E.: 5.6

SMALL BUDGETS, BIG DATA
82%

of information technology decision-makers (ITDM) believe big data will give them a competitive advantage.
But the cost of analyzing big data can be exorbitant.

Overall, 49% say big data has been more expensive than expected.

The portion of decision-makers expressing surprise at costs:

80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
73%B2B organizations
58%Organizations with 3,000+ employees
Big data costs have been driven by:
31% Unexpected infrastructure updates
29% Unexpected hardware purchases
26% New software requirements
0% 50%
41%

of ITDMs who don't use big data and don't intend to say cost is the prohibitive factor.

THE DIGITAL DIVIDE

The Internet and digital technologies have redefined the global business landscape—but their benefits have yet to reach billions of people.

60%

of the world's population has never gone online.

450 million

people can't access a mobile network.

DISRUPTION EVERYWHERE

In energy:
97% of global energy and utility executives expect a medium or high amount of disruption in their home market by 2020.

60%

expect their home market to be transformed by 2030.

In health care:
70% of global health care organizations will invest in consumer-facing apps and wearable tech by 2018.

65%

of U.S. health care transactions will be made via a mobile device by 2018.

In the workforce:
More people are now leaving the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development-member workforce than joining it... yet 44% of companies have done nothing yet to address the issue.

Companies identify these challenges in managing the aging workforce:

27%

Understanding employee intentions

27%

No budget/resources

22%

Multiple stakeholders to manage

18%

Higher priority items

REINVENTION GETS STUCK IN THE MIDDLE

A true reinvention calls for engagement at all levels of an organization—but it too often falters in middle man- agement, which is perpetually frustrated by a lack of mobility and decision rights.

MOVING UP—OR NOT

Only 3% of middle managers are motivated to deliver results by the prospect of climbing the ladder—possibly because of a perceived lack of opportunity or a disconnect between hard work and promotions.

48% say they might get promoted in the next three years.

37% think they will not get promoted.

15% think they will be promoted.

61%

Would not be satisfied at their current level for the next five years.

35%

find it very important to move up.

40%

find it somewhat important.

NOT A PIPE DREAM

Though middle managers are not overwhelmingly confident in their ability to move up, they aspire to higher-level work at the following organizational levels:

Top functional executive
43%
30%
Another management- level position
Managing director
15%
12%
Corporate officer
SOURCES OF FRUSTRATION

Middle managers rank the following as their primary causes for frustration at work:

No.1
Critical decisions made without their input
No.2
Changing organizational priorities
No.3
Immediate manager doesn't listen
THE C-SUITE'S OPPORTUNITY

Inspiration is one of the primary ways a leader can produce results. But to inspire managers, executives need to interact with them directly.

25%
of middle managers interact with the C-suite more than once a month.
16%
have between five and eight meaningful interactions per year.
13%
have two interactions per year.
12%
have no interactions per year.
0
5
10
15
20
25

Source: PwC Global Power & Utilities Survey 2015; IDC Health Insights

Source: World Economic Forum, 2015 Global Information Technology Report; VansonBourne, Big Data Technology Market Research